Mohammad Al-Ubaydli’s blog

O’Cracy: D.E.M., died 26/06/1976

Posted in Books, History, Society by Dr Mohammad Al-Ubaydli on April 10, 2009

Here is another story from Indira Gandhi’s emergency rule in India. It is only in the last couple of months that I have been learning about this period in India’s history and this quotation is also from Rafiq Dossani’s India Arriving.

The Emergency marked both the low point of press freedom and a turning point. With the exception of the Statesman and the Indian Express, the English-language press scraped and groveled to accommodate the state during the Emergency. Even the former had to be very careful to escape the censor’s eye. In what are now iconic tales of defiance, the Indian Express got away with the following message in its obituary section in 1976: “O’Cracy: D.E.M. O’Cracy, beloved husband of T. Ruth, Father of L. I. Berty, father of Faith, Hope and Justice, on June 26.”[1] And a library in Calcutta issued a notice in the Statesman in December 1975, stating: “On and from 1st January 1976, newspapers will be found in the fiction section.”[2]

1. Indian Express, Mumbai edition, June 27, 1976
2. Statesman, Calcutta edition, December 31, 1975.

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The only time Ghandi condoned violence

Posted in History, People / organisations, Places by Dr Mohammad Al-Ubaydli on April 8, 2009

I came across several fascinating stories about Indian women recently and grouped them into one blog post.

India ArrivingFirst, here is the story of India’s first woman stock trader:

It was a man’s world in those busy days. The arrival of the first female stockbroker on the floor of the stock exchange in the late 1980s created a sensation. A tall woman in a sari, she confidently strode toward a particular counter to make her first trade. I was on hand and, to my consternation, the brokers treated her like one of their own. Like any male newcomer, she was disregarded initially; when she tried to force her way into the center of the counter, she was again disregarded, meaning that she had to fight her way in along with two dozen others competing for the jobber’s attention. As I watched her getting pummeled along with the rest as she drilled into the center of the crowd, I wondered how she felt and whether she would be back the next day.

She returned and had her strategy perfectly worked out. She came with a megaphone in hand. Her sari was firmly draped around her so it would not come undone! Standing on the periphery of the counter, she calmly turned on the megaphone to full volume and called on the jobber. The jostling crowd was momentarily stunned into silence, the jobber called out the information she had sought and she made her trade. Since then, she has become a very successful broker.

This is from the charming book India Arriving by Rafiq Dossani which is full of other such accounts from his experience as an investment banker, technocrat and journalist in India.

The next story is from a wonderful two-part interview from Australia’s Philosopher’s Zone radio interview with American philosopher Martha Nussbaum. In the first interview she discussed the social contract in human societies, and in the second she discussed the implications for animals.

Philosopher's Zone

I know that there was a lawyer, the first female lawyer in India ended up defending an elephant, because she wasn’t hired by the usual bar association, and so she ended up working for a Maharajah and he just thought it was fun to put the elephant on trial for trampling the bamboo grove. But I think that was just an entertainment.

Imagining IndiaThe final quote is from Imagining India, the deliciously intellectual book by Infosys co-founder Nandan Nilekani. It is from the chapter about population growth, now understood as a demographic dividend, but in the last century interpreted as an impending disaster. In 1960 India consumed one eighth of the USA’s wheat production, and by 1966 it consumed one fourth. In frustration the government tried all kinds of actions, beginning with persuasion and culminating in the dictatorship of Indira Gandhi and her forced mass sterilizations in the country side. One of the earlier, gentler, acts of persuasion was to teach women the rhythm method. From this teaching comes perhaps the only statement from the great man, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, advocating violence:

Wives should fight off their husbands with force, if necessary.

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